Buying Our Home: Part II

Okay. So when I left you last, we had got our offer accepted on our first house pending some inspections.

After phone calls galore, I was able to find out that the previous owners had done some extensive work on the well to annihilate the e. coli problem. They had installed a UV light to kill all of the bacteria and had some other work done to prevent future colonies. We found the receipts later and the work on the well was nearly $2000.

My father, skilled in woodworking, was able to look at the photos of the dry rotted floor joists and safely conclude that we would be able to fix it, but with the limited crawl space area, we would have to tear up the floors downstairs in their entirety. We did not have a problem with this, as our inspector discovered a couple small patches of sub-floor were drywall… Which is bad. Really bad. And the carpet was from the 70s…

Our inspector was super thorough and most of the issues seemed manageable to us. We would have to clean the gutters, divert the downspouts, fix the leaky roof on the shop, and a few other odds and ends, but we figure that’s what your 20s are for, right?

The inspector did say that there was virtually no water pressure in the sinks/shower and the water was brown. Uh oh.
After more emails and phone calls, we discovered that after extensive well servicing, the water can become very muddy and clog the filters. This is exactly what had happened, and shouldn’t be a problem once a new filter is installed.

So after all of our questions were answered, we removed our contingency on our offer and were ready to proceed with the deal.

The next step was to lock in our mortgage with the bank. This is where the real circus began. I was the official printer/scanner master and was responsible for getting everything signed, by the hubby, and sending back to the appropriate parties. This felt like a full time job. We got very little notice about what needed to happen and had a vast number of documents we had to arrange including explanations of where certain deposits came from, why we wanted to commute an hour to and from the house every day, and I even had to provide proof that one of my deposits was from inheritance from my grandfather who had passed the previous year.

We finally got everything in, and then the waiting game began. We never seemed to hear anything from the bank, which I personally found to be the most frustrating part of the whole process. We didn’t want to seem annoying, but we felt very in the dark about everything that was going on. Our Realtor was very patient and kept reminding us that we were never a bother so we kept in good contact with him to keep us in the loop.

One of my good friends who had bough a house a few weeks before us said, “don’t hold your breath for closing”. We knew the process was rocky at best so we tried to be patient, hoping to hear anything about progress being made.

We got anxious as estimated closing dates came and went, and about two weeks later I called our Realtor again and he said they had decided to start signing the next day!

What?!

So began the mad scramble to get time off from work to go to the title company to sign in the morning. We had to get the funds wired to the title company and get everything in order. To make it even more fun, our Realtor had a vacation scheduled and he needed to be at the airport by 10, so if the 8 am closing didn’t work out, we would be flying solo, which was terrifying.

The title company had everything very well organized and signing took about an hour. It was all downhill from there. After our wire of the down payment and closing costs went through we were able to pick up the keys that day.

It felt so good to have those keys in our hands at the end of it! We’ve both decided we don’t want to buy another house for a long, long time, which is fine because we have plenty of space and things to do at the new house!

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Our new house!

 

Join us on our big adventure of being homeowners, more posts to come!

Author: Kaya

Kaya Diem has been farming on some scale since 2007, from rabbits to radishes and sheep to squash, she hopes to someday be as self-sufficient as possible. Kaya graduated from Oregon State University in 2014 with an Animal Sciences degree. She lives in Seaside, OR with her husband, dog, and various farm critters on about 5 acres.

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